Chronic Pain Treatment San Diego

 
Dissolving Pain

Dissolving Pain

Narrowly focused or concentrated attention is part of a normal crisis response that helps prepare us to cope with immediate danger.  We become tense.  This is the survival brain in action, locating and focusing in on a threat.  Ideally, when the crisis is over, we release all tension in muscles, ligaments, tendons, and fascia.  However, for some of us accumulated tension lingers on in the body, long after the crisis has resolved.  Body tissues (particularly in the low back) can retain this tension for months and perhaps years following an injury.

Soft-tissue tension can become an independent pain generator. Mental tension can be equally problematic. Thinking about pain (and tightening up that part of our body that is uncomfortable) will aggravate suffering tremendously. Read about how dissolving pain is an integral part of chronic pain treatment.

Dissolving Pain

Meditation

We usually think of ourselves in terms of self: a well-organized personal history, occupation, age, sexual identity, marital status, education, and a host of other identifying markers.  However, the more real core of who you are is the underlying awareness that enables you to be you.  This underlying field of awareness is what permits us to be conscious of something.  Without awareness, there is no sense of self or personal identity.  The awareness field is stable and unchanging over the course of your life.  This is why old people are astonished to note that they have become old.  The inner core of awareness is ageless.

Meditation makes it possible to learn how to view pain as a relatively small event within the vast field of awareness, rather than a gigantic event that overwhelms and then dominates our sense of identity. The next step is to begin the practice of accepting the presence of pain sensations and no longer seeking to avoid or  erase pain. Read more about meditation and chronic pain treatment.

Healthy Breathing

Healthy Breathing

The act of breathing sounds simple but involves some rather complicated physiology.  It clearly has a profound effect upon us, but breathing also is something we usually take for granted.  Think about it…you don’t have to tell yourself to breathe.  It just happens.  Unless there is a problem, we usually don’t pay much attention to breathing.  However, it’s important for us to understand more about breathing because when we’re stressed, we usually breathe in a lot more air.  This can create problems later if we continue to breathe heavily when we’re not physically active and burning off oxygen.

Increasing the amount of air we breathe during a crisis is not something we think about doing, it just happens as we prepare to cope with danger.  It can later become an unconscious habit.  Without us being aware of it, this permanent change in our breathing behavior can dramatically affect both physical and mental health. Learn how healthy breathing can help you deal with chronic pain.


 

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3 Types of Pain: Acute, Chronic and Sensory

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